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#F1 FYI: Flags And What They Mean

by on February 7, 2013
GREEN FLAG

GREEN FLAG

GREEN FLAG:

The green flag signals to all drivers that the track is clear.  Drivers are free to race or carry on at normal race speeds in the case of testing or qualifying.

YELLOW FLAG

YELLOW FLAG

YELLOW FLAG:

A single yellow flag informs the driver that there is a

potentially dangerous situation ahead and to proceed with caution. It could be as simple as debris or as serious as a crash.  As drivers pass through the affected “caution zone”, they slow down and avoid overtaking unless unavoidable. In some instances, there may be two yellow flags waived which is an indicator of a more dangerous or severe situation.  Drivers can expect to be forced to stop.   Full course yellows are usually associated with a safety car period.  Drivers are required to follow the safety car and drive slowly with extreme caution.

BLUE FLAG

BLUE  FLAG

BLUE FLAG :

The infamous Blue flag is used to notify a driver that they are about to be lapped by a faster car.  The driver is therefore  aware that they are about to be passed and they they must allow for ample room for the faster car, to do so safely.
During a race, a light blue flag waved on the track warns the driver that they are about to be lapped by a faster car and must let it pass. Failure to obey three  successive blue flags will result in a penalty.

RED FLAG

RED FLAG

RED FLAG:

The Red flag condition indicates that on-track activities have been stopped.  The Red flag is encompasses the entire circuit and all race marshals are obliged to wave the flag.  During this period, all cars not in the pits will be placed in racing order and will remain stationary at the red flag line.  Those cars that may be in the pits, may not leave.  The safety car may be deployed and all cars are to follow it into the pits, however cars are not allowed to enter the pits otherwise.  The red flag condition will only be relieved, once the race director deems the track safe  or the situation causing the flag, to be over.

WHITE FLAG

WHITE FLAG

WHITE FLAG:

Indicates that a slow vehicle is on the circuit.  It may be crane, tow truck or emergency vehicle.  This flag is also shown when there is one lap remaining in the current race.

BLACK & WHITE DIAGONAL FLAG

BLACK & WHITE DIAGONAL FLAG

BLACK & WHITE DIAGONAL FLAG:

This flag is rarely seen.  It is to be shown to a driver displaying unsportsmanlike conduct.  It is considered a warning for the driver and an indication that the driver is to immediately begin to act more sportingly. Failure to do so may find the driver receiving a penalty.  Normally, this flag is also accompanied by the driver’s ca number in order for the message to be clearly conveyed to the offending driver.

BLACK FLAG

BLACK FLAG

BLACK FLAG

This flag is used to instruct a driver back to the pits for a penalty.  Most times, but not all, it indicates the end of a driver’s race.

BLACK FLAG WITH ORANGE CIRCLE

BLACK FLAG WITH ORANGE CIRCLE

BLACK FLAG WITH ORANGE CIRCLE

This is another very seldom used flag.  It is displayed to a driver whose car is potentially harmful or dangerous to fellow drivers.  The conditions are normally caused by a mechanical failure or a the result of an accident/crash.

YELLOW & RED STRIPED FLAG

YELLOW & RED STRIPED FLAG

YELLOW &  RED STRIPED FLAG

This is Formula One’s “Caution, Slipper When Wet”  flag. It indicates the track is very slippery.

CHEQUERED FLAG

CHEQUERED FLAG

CHEQUERED FLAG

This flag indicates the end of the race. First to see this flag wins the race!

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From → Features, Formula One

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